Job Outlook and Opportunities and Salaries for Teaching English as a Second Language

Published by Concordia University, Nebraska 7 months ago on Fri, Feb 25, 2022 3:54 PM

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Earning the Teaching English as a Second Language Salary You Desire Begins at Concordia Nebraska 

Teaching English as a second language online or in person can be a very rewarding career. Likewise, designing or coordinating curriculum for English language learners can be equally gratifying.

If you’re an educator who is looking to advance professionally, what is TESOL going to do for you? Shifting to a career in TESOL, or teaching English to speakers of other languages, can be a great next step for you and your career.

English language learners are a diverse group of people who represent a variety of languages, cultures, ethnicities and nationalities, according to the U.S. Department of Education. And while English learners face unique challenges in comparison to native English speakers, they are a tremendous asset for our country, the department notes.

By the Numbers: What to Expect From a Teaching English as a Second Language Salary

As non-native English speakers work to acquire the language, they’ll need educators who are proficient at teaching English as a second language online or in person. Educators like you. Not only will continuing your education advance your professional skills, but it can also put you on track to earning a teaching English as a second language salary. 

What is TESOL going to help you earn? As with other careers, a variety of factors can affect your earning potential when it comes to a teaching English as a second language salary. These include your geographical location, professional experience and the type of learning institution where you are or will be employed.

Keeping that in mind, the national average base salary for a TESOL teacher is $50,300, according to Glassdoor. If you’re interested in teaching English as a second language online rather than in a classroom, your salary could vary greatly by employer.

Your level of education may also contribute to the teaching English as a second language salary that may be available to you. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data show that people who have earned higher levels of education tend to earn more money and experience lower rates of unemployment compared with workers who have lower levels of education.

For example, people with a master’s degree had median weekly earnings of $1,545 in 2020, according to the BLS. Those with a bachelor’s degree, on the other hand, had median weekly earnings of $1,305—a difference of $12,480 per year.

Now that you have a better handle on the potential teaching English as a second language salary you may earn and some of the factors that may influence it, we’ll cover a variety of TESOL jobs that may interest you—and what you can do to break into the field.

Curious About a Career in TESOL? Here Are Some TESOL Jobs to Explore

If you’re thinking of pursuing a career in TESOL, it might be helpful for you to gain a better understanding of what is TESOL. It’s very similar to teaching ESL, or English as a second language. However, like all TESOL jobs, licensure and certification requirements for TESOL teachers and ESL teachers may vary and differ by institution and state.
If you’re interested in a career in TESOL, here are a few to explore. Keep in mind that academic requirements and other qualifications such as licensure and certification may vary for each.

  • Adult education TESOL teacher: These TESOL jobs typically are available through local education agencies and community organizations, and are often part time, according to the TESOL International Association. Students are often people who have immigrated to the U.S., the association notes. You may find organizations looking for educators with experience in teaching English as a second language online for these roles, too.
  • K–12 teacher: With the appropriate certification and licensure, you may teach in public or private schools, for? after-school programs and more. Most states require at least a bachelor's degree in education for these TESOL jobs, according to the TESOL International Association, though some states now require a master’s degree.
  • University- or community college-level English as a second language instructor: Many universities and community colleges offer English classes taught by full- and part-time TESOL instructors. These classes may be offered online or in person, during the day or in the evenings. 
  • Instructional design director/coordinator: As an instructional design director or coordinator, you may design courses, develop curricula, create training materials for educators and learning materials for students and more. What is TESOL going to do for you in this mix? Having the skills and knowledge of a TESOL educator will be beneficial for you in this role because you’ll have the knowledge and experience you need to create safe and effective learning environments that meet all students’ needs—including those whose first language isn’t English.
  • International ESL teacher: What is TESOL like in other countries? Several countries have ESL and TESOL programs for students who are learning English as a second language. For some of these positions, the teaching English as a second language salary you earn may also include travel expenses, room and board and more.

Educators Teaching English as a Second Language Online and in Person Are in Demand

English learners are a growing part of the K–12 student population, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Between the 2009–10 and 2014–15 school years alone, for instance, the percentage of English learners in these grades increased throughout more than half of the country, with increases of more than 40% in five states.

Qualified English as a second language teachers are in demand in public schools and in adult education ESL programs, according to the TESOL International Association. The association notes that areas with significant immigrant and refugee communities have a particularly high need for educators who can teach English as a second language, such as California, Florida, Illinois, New York and Texas.

The demand we see today for people who can make a career in TESOL will likely continue. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects 5,100 openings for adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers each year, through 2030.

Begin a Career in TESOL at Concordia Nebraska

If you’re a current teacher or education professional but would like to pivot into a career in TESOL, you can earn the qualifications you need at Concordia University, Nebraska.

Through our online M.Ed. in TESOL, you may choose to specialize your master’s degree in one of three areas, including English as a second language/English language learner endorsement. Through this concentration, you’ll focus on curriculum, instruction and assessment that meet the needs of English language learners of all ages and walks of life.

At Concordia Nebraska, when you join our M.Ed. program, you’re pursuing a degree with value(s). We are a Lutheran community committed to the development of the whole person—and as educators, we can help you learn to do the same in a classroom of your own.

Is Concordia Nebraska for you? Request more information now.